2011 NATIONAL VOLUNTEER AWARD - Sharon Glock

2011 NATIONAL VOLUNTEER AWARD - Sharon Glock
For the past 20 years, Sharon Glock has been a dedicated volunteer with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Sharon and her family have lived on a deserted island – an 18-mile boat trip off the coast of Georgia; resided along the Mississippi coast; shoveled the winter snows of New Jersey, New York, and Maryland; and now live in the most western high desert sky island of Arizona. She has operated skid steers, hydraulic excavators, boats of assorted sizes and all-terrain vehicles.

It is impossible to mention all of the different jobs that Sharon has done over the years, but here are a few: Working with nesting loggerhead sea turtles—searching daily for new nests, probing for and finding nest cavities, moving those nests only when necessary, protecting the nests with wire screens, and watching hatchlings emerge by the hundreds; mowing and maintaining roads and campgrounds; teaching CPR to service personnel; installing extremely heavy timber sea wall pieces; greeting visitors; leading tours; keeping kiosks clean and stocked with brochures and maps; serving as a deckhand on watercraft to move materials and supplies; assisting with the rescue of a group of sailors whose vessel had been driven onto the beach by a severe storm; helping many who were lost or who had mechanical problems (mostly boats but some airplanes, too!); and repainting a huge old refuge sign from a floating vessel. And that was on just one refuge.

Other jobs that Sharon has had the privilege to handle have included: organizing and creating filing systems for more than 20 years of photos; entering 18 years worth of research data for the Delmarva Fox Squirrel; and committing more than 20 years of paperwork to an electronic, searchable filing program for two different stations. She has torn down houses, silos, and barns and loaded the materials into dumpsters for removal; taken Heavy Equipment Safety Training; rebuilt wildlife release pens and have worked at public events such as refuge open houses, fishing events, and local refuge threatened-and/or-endangered-species celebrations and so much more. Her participation in interpretation, education, festivals, and outreach furthers awareness and support of our natural heritage. Her heartfelt caring for people shows in her initiative when independently hosting and cooking for volunteer appreciation events. Because of Sharon’s work, six wildlife refuges have smoother technical and administrative function.

Wherever Sharon volunteers, things are better!